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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. tom hudson will be along a little later in the program. ho-hum sales for the nation's retailers this christmas, ringing up the worst holiday season in four years, we talk with a top retail analyst. president obama and congressional leaders cut their vacations short, to deal with fiscal cliff negotiations. they have five days to make a deal. and housing continues to be the bright spot in the u.s. economy: home prices post their biggest advance in two years. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! christmas may be over, but the holiday shopping season continues. many consumers hit the malls today to return gifts and buy what they really wanted. and this is the time many gift cards get redeemed. but for retailers, holiday sales so far have been a flop. sales in the two months leading up to christmas, rose just 0.7%, according to mastercard advisors that tracks the numbers. that's way below what the retail industry was predicting. erika miller spoke with retail expert dana telsey and began by asking what happened. >>
>> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening. i'm susie gharib. tom hudson will be along a little later in the program. a positive turn in the fiscal cliff crisis. house republicans agree to meet sunday night to resume talks after a day of finger-pointing and complaining in washington. on wall street, fiscal fears created whiplash for investors: a big stock market sell-off and then bounce back on word that lawmakers are springing back into action. and, if you used your smartphone to shop this christmas, you're in fashion. it was the year's top retail trend. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a dramatic cliff-hanger today between washington and wall street about the fiscal cliff. stocks initially sold off after senate majority leader harry reid predicted the economy would go over the cliff. speaking from the senate floor he said there's not enough time between now and the end of the year to reach a deal. but stocks erased their losses ithe final hour of trading on news that the house of representatives will reconvene on sunday night to resume talks. by the closing bell, the dow w
? that's what tom hudson asked toll brothers chief financial officer marty connor. >> the housing market willcontig as done consumer confidence maintains or improfls. and a lot of that will be contingent on resolution of the fiscal cliff and the government and the economy. >> a lot of ways to measure thet but the most direct way for momentum home buyers and sellers is prices. do you expect that trajectory to continue? >> i do.we have raised prices ia little more than half of our communities. it's been relatively modest. but as we observe and we read stats, we are getting a lit lite more confident and may push prices a bit more in 2013. >> what are you finding in termg materials. the commodity that it takes to put up the toll brother homes. >> we are seeing that increasea. in 2012 we have seen the cost go up $4,500 a home. move o most of that was in the commodities. as we go to 2013 it's hard to predict. i don't think we'll see labor stay war i where it is and thatl increase and the commodity as well. >> do you expect it to remainch. >> i do expect it to remainchea. the fed has made that
now on the table, are the talks reaching a new level? >> tom: i'm tom hudson. what happens to stock prices if we go over the cliff, what could higher taxes and government spending cuts mean for your portfolio? >> susie: and sprint agrees to pay just over $2 billion to buy the rest of cellular technology company clearwire it doesn't already own.
: i'm tom hudson. president obama tries to win over top business leaders, warning republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff.
be tricky. tom hudson recently spoke to a top branding expert who knows how to strike the right note, when connecting with consumers. >> a branding and advertisingme. steve welcome to the program. >> you were the among the firsto corporate america. what opportunity lie in that bridge. >> well i learned very earlyfroy that there was tremendous affinity amongst young adults and they would gather from different back grounds and graces and rewill i g religionsd music they would all come together. i felt it would be like a very good platform for fortune 500 companies to market their products. >> what greeting did you havewht gap? greeting? well it was tough in the beginning, tom. you are basically trying to get a company of a large organization who was used to marketing a certain way to deal with a shipment. shipment -- shift. a cultural shift. my biggest allies was when these ceo's had teenagers in their household. the teenagers would be list ening to music or partaking in something that the parents didn't ugs and the ugs ug underd an affinity for. it was a lot of corporations that were suffer
plans. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. businesses aren't waiting for a deal, they're rewarding shareholds with special dividends ahead of higher taxes in 2013. >> susie: investors sour on yum brands, after the parent of k.f.c. and pizza hut says sales are slowing in china. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: the fiscal cliff talks are going nowhere. that's the word from john boehner today. the house speaker characterized the negotiations to avoid huge tax increases and spending cuts at a stalemate. the race to solve the fiscal cliff triggered another round of dramatic sound bites from republicans and president obama. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: the president is still pushing to wrap up a deal on the fiscal cliff before christmas and just in case anyone missed that point, he visited a toy factory to urge congress to avoid raising taxes on the middle class. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. a typical middle-class family of four would see their income taxes go up by about $2,200. >> reporter: t psidents op
to entitlement spending, and no new taxes on the wealthy. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. auto sales speed up in november, with buyers taking advantage of ultra-cheap financing to ditch their old cars. >> susie: ford takes the wraps off a new lincoln, taking the brand back to its heritage, but will a re-branding help rev-up sales, we ask ford c.e.o. alan mulally. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! after a weekend of trading accusations over the lack of progress on avoiding the fiscal cliff, both sides now have put their opening offers on the table. last week, it was treasury secretary timothy geithner meeting with top republicans. this afternoon, house speaker john boehner sketched out the g.o.p. proposal in a letter to the white house, and the proposal borrows suggestions from the president's own debt reduction commission, whose plan was ignored last year. the republican letter offered $900 billion in spending cuts from program reforms to medicare and social security. the g.o.p. plan would raise $800 billion in revenues by closing loop-holes and reforming the tax code, but stops short of specifi
>> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. the nation's governors met with president obama today about what they need to see in a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with delaware governor jack markell. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. a coalition of the nation's top c.e.o.s is feeling pessimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal. the group's leader joins us, maya macguinneas. >> tom: and luxury fashion meets the mass market. who wins with target's pairing with neiman marcus? >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: there wasn't much obvious ground given today between president obama and congressional republicans in the effort to avoid the fiscal cliff in january. president obama repeated his pledge he's open to new ideas, but is holding firm on his call for higher taxes on top income earners, something missing from the g.o.p. plan. with just three weeks left, the two sides are still at odds with their opening offers. th time ticking away to reach a deal before tax cuts expire and spending cuts hit, president obama today said he's still optimi
america? >> tom: i'm tom hudson. president obama tries to win over top business leaders, warning republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if t
. and on twitter @bizrpt. >> tom: i'm tom hudson with an nbr news brief. apple will return some of its computer manufacturing to the u.s. c.e.o. tim cook said the company will invest $100 million, about 1% of what it spends on factories, to make one line of its mac computers in america. new claims for jobless benefits fell by 25,000 in theeek ending december 1 to a lower than expected 370,000 requests. on wall street today, the dow rose 39 points, the nasdaq added 15, the s&p up nearly five. tomorrow, we'll talk to three small business c.e.o.s who are hiring, and find out how they're helping to chip away at the unemployment rate. and our friday "market monitor" guest says there are four things that could lead to a better economy in 2013. he's mark luschini of janney montgomery scott. for more financial news, tune in to nbr weeknights on this public television station.
'm tom hudson. we meet the c.e.o.'s of three small businesses hiring right now. what they do and why they're looking for help. >> susie: and house speaker boehner accuses president obama of wasting another week in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the job market is proving to be surprisingly resilient. american employers hired 146,000 workers in november, much more than expected. and the unemployment rate fell to 7.7%, the lowest level since december of 2008. as erika miller reports, that wasn't the only surprise in today's report. >> reporter: almost no one on wall street saw this good news coming. there was every reason to think hiring would be weak last month. after all, many parts of the east coast are still recovering from devastation caused by superstorm sandy. >> i think the most likely explanation here is sandy's impact was significant but was so short-lived that it didn't extend to the sample period of the employment report which was the week that covered november 12. >> reporter: hiring was also supposed to be weak due to worries
. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. two hurricanes in two years for the northeast-- a region not used to big storms comes to terms with the cleanup and cost. >> susie: and it's green monday, one of the most popular days for online shoppers. we've got details. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: president obama was in michigan today, campaigning on his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. speaking to union workers at the daimler detroit diesel engine plant, the president said he is willing to compromise "a little bit" with republicans on getting a plan for economic growth, job creation, and reducing the deficit. but he said he would not compromise on raising tax rates for high-income earners. >> and that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks, and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans, or suddenly, a school doesn't have school books because the school district couldn't afford it. >> susie: meanwhile, a ranking democrat on the house budget committee tel
drops to 6.5%. >> tom: good evening,. i'm tom hudson. the central bank also will continue buying billions of dollars of government bonds in its effort to keep interest rates low. pimco c.e.o. mohamed el-erian will join us. >> susie: and the legal marijuana business-- two states okaying it for recreational use. we talk with one company profiting from medical marijuana products. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: an historic move today by the federal reserve. fed chairman ben bernanke and other policy makers said they will keep their key interest rate near zero until the unemployment rate falls below 6.5% or inflation rises to 2.5%. now, this is the first time the fed has set a clear economic target for how long interest rates will stay at record lows. the surprise decision means the central bank will continue stimuting the economy by buying bonds. darren gersh explains the dramatic move. >> reporter: ben bernanke and his colleagues will no longer mark a date on the calendar for when they expect to begin raising interest rates. from now on, they'll make that call b
>> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. with the january 1 deadline to avoid the fiscal cliff about two weeks away, neither side appears to be giving any ground. >> susie: i'm susie gharb. the u.s. stock markeis expeed to be the world's best performer in 2013. that's the prediction of john rogers of the c.f.a. institute. he joins us tonight. >> tom: and new rules for health care also are around the corner. tonight, we look at how small businesses are preparing for the changes. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: there's no deal, but the two sides are still talking. house speaker john boehner and president obama met earlier this evening at the white house in an effort to move forward the stalled fiscal cliff talks. there are now just 18 days before the tax hikes and spending cuts thatake up the clf take efft, and today, there were few signs of progress. as darren gersh reports, the tone of the talks, if anything, is getting worse. >> reporter: house democratic leader nancy pelosi may just have a second career as a stock analyst.
this holiday as turns out. >> good evening, i am tom hudson just in time for the holidays, cheapers gasoline and the prices could keep falling, they could at all below $3 a gallon in the new year. >> and why a new program to hell student loan borrowers could be a big win for high earners with graduate degrees. >> that and more tonight on nbr. >> we begin the friday broadcast with the count down to for christmas and the retailers. >> so far this holiday shopping season is really looking rather ho-hum. >> there is stilllenty of time to give retailers and their investors a green season, but it is not clear shoppers will turn into buyers in time. susan pratt reports. >> it doesn't >> reporter: it doesn't get more festive than this. or this. or even this. but, just because we've decked the halls, doesn't mean we're hitting the malls. in fact, it looks like u.s. consumers are doing what they do best in mid-decmber: procrastinating. how are you doing on your holiday shopping? >> pretty poorly to be honest with you. my wife typically takes care of most of it. last year, i was definitely ahead of the
for millionaires now on the table, are the talks reaching a new level? >> tom: i'm tom hudson. what happens to stock prices if we go over the cliff, what could higher taxes and government spending cuts mean for your portfolio? >> susie: and sprint agrees to pay just over $2 billion to buy the rest of cellular technology company clearwire it doesn't already own. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: president obama and house speaker boehner m for w netiatns tday. after the 45 minute meeting, the white house said "more needs to be done," and boehner's camp said the president is receptive to the new concessions. they include, dropping opposition to the president's demand for higher taxes on the wealthiest americans and an automatic extension of the federal debt limit. it was the third face-to-face meeting between the president and boehner in eight days. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: house speaker john boehner wasn't talking after meeting with the president today. but his offer to raise taxes on those making more than a million dollars a year was taken as a sign that
captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. president obama urges house speaker john boehner to take his deal on the fiscal cliff, calling it something republicans can be proud of. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. the c.e.o. of manufacturer johnson controls says business is looking good for 2013, but going over the fiscal cliff could change that. >> tom: and the u.s. treasury speeds up plans to sell its stake in general motors. is the automaker ready to stand alone? >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: under the threat of a white house veto, the u.s. house of representatives is expected to vote tomorrow on the republican plan-b to avoid the fiscal cliff. house speaker john boehner thinks the house will okay the package, trying to turn the heat up on president obama to steer clear of automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts due to take affect in 12 days. still, as darren gersh reports, there are some signs the two sides are narrowing their differences. >> reporter: house republicans say they're still working on plan a:
investment officer at the motley fool. tom hudson recently spoke with him, and began by asking if the s&p 500 will be higher or lower this time next year. >> that's a tough question. i'm not in the job of picking the stocks over, you know, three, six, nine, even 12 months is tough for me. here's what i do think. i do think we'll get some resolution to the fiscal cliff, whether it's right now or whether it's soon after the new year, i think we will see some kind of resolution. that will be good for markets, good for business, good for investors. so i'm going into 2013 wanting to be long some really good high quality companies that i know can accrue returns for investors over time. and i don't want to think with the next few months. >> tom: let's focus on the next year ahead. what about volatility, do you think you'll need an iron stomach to be a stock investor? >> i think investing in stocks, in equities comes volatility. we're not buying bonds here, we're not sticking the cash in our mattress in our beds. so i think with investing if you're going to be an investor you have to be able to handl
sydney finklelstein has been tracking the nation's worst c.e.o.'s. tom hudson recently spoke with him, and begins our three-part look at the nation's worst chief executives, and why they made finkelstein's list. >> school of business at dartmouth with us tonight in new york. sydney, nice to see you and welcome. you have four of the worst c.e.o.'s of the year, beginning with number 4, mark pincus, manager of zynga that relies on facebook for its success. what brought mark to your list. >> facebook and zynga announced they would go their separate ways and no longer be tied in and you can guess who that will affect more, facebook or zynga. one executive manager after another has left and that is always something i have seen as one of the reason warnings signs of something going wrong. along the way acquisition was made for $180 millujjy didn't take them more than half a year to write down 50% of the value of that acquisition. so it really look like a company that is floundering and mark pincus along the way ended out cashing out as quickly as possible raising eye browse in the possible.
. tom hudson talks with sydney finkelstein of the tuck school of business at dartmouth. >> sydney finkelstein is with the tuft school of business at dartmouth, with us again from new york. we spoke last time about your four worst c.e.o.'s. you had two more that were really seen at visionaries but really brought down-to-earth this year. they almost made your list of bad c.e.o.'s. the first is well-known mark zuckerberg, c.e.o. of facebook. the company seems to be trying to get its legs under it now that it is maturing a little bit here. >> what worried me about mark zuckerberg and why he almost got on the list is he has created a little dictatorship as facebook, even though he only owns now a small percentage of the company because the jewel's stock structure and the way he controlled the board of directors he will be a tough guy to get rid of if something does go wrong. so classic traditional and valuable, corporate governance measurements have been thrown out of the door. at the same time i think zuckerberg has been very slow in addressing the rise of mobile has a way in which so
, agrees to a takeover by the intercontinental exchange. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. former republican senator judd gregg joins us as the u.s. house prepares to vote on the republican plan "b" for avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and investors gobble up shares of blackberry maker research in motion as the smart phone maker posts better than expected quarterly results. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: here at the new york stock exchange, the big trade of the day was the big board itself. the n.y.s.e.-euronext has agreed to sell itself to the intercontinental exchange, an acquisition that would reshape wall street. it's an $8.2 billion deal that values the n.y.s.e. at $33 a share, a 38% premium to wednesday's close. so what are the implications of an upstart exchange buying the venerable big board? erika miller reports. >> reporter: the new york stock exchange has been the symbol of capitalism for nearly two centuries, but now it wants to give up its independence and be bought by a little-known rival in atlanta. the intercontinental exchange, or "ice" for sh
>> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. the fiscal cliff debate hits the floor of the u.s. house but not much progress is made. warren buffett and others tell lawmakers to look for more money from the estate tax. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. could another major bond-buying program be on the way? what we could hear tomorrow as federal reserve policymakers wrap up their two-day meeting. >> tom: ever wonder what goes into making those cardboard store displays? tonight, we look at how one box company is using them to reinvent itself. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: an agreement to ease the fiscal cliff may not be wrapped up and waiting under your tree for christmas. senate majority leader harry reid said today it would be hard to get an agreement finished by the holiday, blaming the delay on republicans. not surprisingly, republicans say the president hasn't gotten serious about the talks. plenty of outside groups are offering up suggestions. and as darren gersh reports, they include warren buffett and some other big names in fin
, and no new taxes on the wealthy. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. auto sales speed up in november, with buyers taking advantage of ultra-cheap financing to ditch
.s. businesses add 146,000 jobs in november. we look behind the numbers. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. we meet the c.e.o.'s of three small businesses hiring right now. what they do and why they're looking for help. >> susie: and house speaker boehner accuses president obama of wasting another week in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> tom: that and more tonight on
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)